Keeping your skin healthy

Doctors To Youhealth, top pick, Wellness

Your skin reveals a lot about your overall health and can serve as a clear reflection of what’s going inside your body. Every year, the American Academy of Dermatologists uses the month of November to bring about awareness for skin health to help you understand how to prevent and treat the most common skin problems. 

Skin is often overlooked when considering our most vital organs but not all of our organs are inside, and believe it or not, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. As concierge physicians, many of the calls we receive that concern the skin are for traumas, like cuts, bruises, burns, etc., or reactions such as rashes or other inflammatory responses due to allergies, bug bites, or dermatological conditions.

Because skin plays such an integral role in helping to detect other problems within the body, since many skin changes are symptomatic rather than diagnostic, you want to always consider changes in your skin’s appearance or texture to be serious, as it may be trying to tell you something.




Your skin reveals a lot about your overall health and can serve as a clear reflection of what’s going inside your body. Every year, the American Academy of Dermatologists uses the month of November to bring about awareness for skin health to help you understand how to prevent and treat the most common skin problems. 

Skin is often overlooked when considering our most vital organs but not all of our organs are inside, and believe it or not, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. As concierge physicians, many of the calls we receive that concern the skin are for traumas, like cuts, bruises, burns, etc., or reactions such as rashes or other inflammatory responses due to allergies, bug bites, or dermatological conditions.

Because skin plays such an integral role in helping to detect other problems within the body, since many skin changes are symptomatic rather than diagnostic, you want to always consider changes in your skin’s appearance or texture to be serious, as it may be trying to tell you something.


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Paying close attention to your skin

The reality is that changes in your skin may be indicative of health changes, and when talking about shin health, the first thing that usually comes to mind when talking about skin health is almost always skin cancer. 

Winter is an especially good time to check yourself carefully for spots with unusual shapes or colors that might indicate skin cancer. Look for moles that seem to appear.” These can come in various shapes, sizes, and even colors. 

Cancer Center says, “It may be difficult to differentiate one form of skin cancer from another, so consult a dermatologist if you notice suspicious or evolving marks on the skin.”

There are less malignant afflictions with the skin that we must still keep in mind when considering our health. For instance, teenagers going through puberty aren’t the only ones who have to worry about breakouts on their face--ugly, painful, or itchy discolored bumps, filled with something you want to squeeze away.

As an adult, these kinds of breakouts are almost always triggered by something more easily solvable than rapidly shifting hormones--although hormones can sometimes be the cause of this. 

The first place to look is at your life and lifestyle. Are you stressed, anxious, or depressed? Stress is America’s #1 health problem. Yes, it affects your heart and your brain, but it can also wreak havoc on your skin. Being stressed out can cause skin reactions that resemble those of allergies or pre-existing dermatological conditions. And if you already have a skin condition such as psoriasis or eczema, stress will make it worse.

Next, you want to take a look at your diet. If you eat something that your body doesn’t like or has trouble digesting, your skin will oftentimes help your body in communicating this to you through rashes, hives, or even changes in complexion.

Hydration is also very important for your skin. If you are not drinking enough water daily, your skin will certainly let you know by becoming dry, wrinkles will become more apparent, and it’ll have an overall itchy and dull look and feel.

Water helps to clear out the toxins in your body and this includes the sky. It also helps your skin to not only feel more hydrated but to be less dry, which is especially important in the colder winter months.


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How to keep skin healthy

Hydration (water) and a healthy diet, rich in whole foods, such as vegetables and some fruit, will have your skin thanking you daily. And although fried foods, fatty dishes, and sweets are so good to us, these are often the culprits when we see pimples and other skin breakouts.

Sunscreen. Using an SPF 30, even during the winter months, is crucial to keep your skin healthy and reducing the appearance of aging.

Exfoliate. We shed a lot more than you might think, and the dead skin cells can build up on top of our healthy skin. Exfoliating simply helps to remove dead skin cells from sitting on your healthy skin, which causes blockages in pores and ultimately unwanted bumps and pimples. How often you exfoliate your body and face may vary based on your skin type.

Instead of buying something from the store, an easy and quick exfoliant is sugar and lemon juice, just make sure not to get the solution into your eyes.

Moisturize. Keeping your skin moisturized does mean you have to buy something expensive; you likely have some great moisturizers in your cupboard right now. Honey, coconut oil, olive oil, and avocado (and avocado oil) are all wonderful topical moisturizers. 

You also may have heard of hyaluronic acid and how vital it is to the skin. Sure, you can buy a product like a serum with this in it, but again, you can also find it in everyday foods like sweet potatoes, citrus fruits, and bone broth.

Paying close attention to your skin

The reality is that changes in your skin may be indicative of health changes, and when talking about shin health, the first thing that usually comes to mind when talking about skin health is almost always skin cancer. 

Winter is an especially good time to check yourself carefully for spots with unusual shapes or colors that might indicate skin cancer. Look for moles that seem to appear.” These can come in various shapes, sizes, and even colors. 

Cancer Center says, “It may be difficult to differentiate one form of skin cancer from another, so consult a dermatologist if you notice suspicious or evolving marks on the skin.”

There are less malignant afflictions with the skin that we must still keep in mind when considering our health. For instance, teenagers going through puberty aren’t the only ones who have to worry about breakouts on their face--ugly, painful, or itchy discolored bumps, filled with something you want to squeeze away.

As an adult, these kinds of breakouts are almost always triggered by something more easily solvable than rapidly shifting hormones--although hormones can sometimes be the cause of this. 

The first place to look is at your life and lifestyle. Are you stressed, anxious, or depressed? Stress is America’s #1 health problem. Yes, it affects your heart and your brain, but it can also wreak havoc on your skin. Being stressed out can cause skin reactions that resemble those of allergies or pre-existing dermatological conditions. And if you already have a skin condition such as psoriasis or eczema, stress will make it worse.

Next, you want to take a look at your diet. If you eat something that your body doesn’t like or has trouble digesting, your skin will oftentimes help your body in communicating this to you through rashes, hives, or even changes in complexion.

Hydration is also very important for your skin. If you are not drinking enough water daily, your skin will certainly let you know by becoming dry, wrinkles will become more apparent, and it’ll have an overall itchy and dull look and feel.

Water helps to clear out the toxins in your body and this includes the sky. It also helps your skin to not only feel more hydrated but to be less dry, which is especially important in the colder winter months.



How to keep skin healthy

Hydration (water) and a healthy diet, rich in whole foods, such as vegetables and some fruit, will have your skin thanking you daily. And although fried foods, fatty dishes, and sweets are so good to us, these are often the culprits when we see pimples and other skin breakouts.

Sunscreen. Using an SPF 30, even during the winter months, is crucial to keep your skin healthy and reducing the appearance of aging.

Exfoliate. We shed a lot more than you might think, and the dead skin cells can build up on top of our healthy skin. Exfoliating simply helps to remove dead skin cells from sitting on your healthy skin, which causes blockages in pores and ultimately unwanted bumps and pimples. How often you exfoliate your body and face may vary based on your skin type.

Instead of buying something from the store, an easy and quick exfoliant is sugar and lemon juice, just make sure not to get the solution into your eyes.

Moisturize. Keeping your skin moisturized does mean you have to buy something expensive; you likely have some great moisturizers in your cupboard right now. Honey, coconut oil, olive oil, and avocado (and avocado oil) are all wonderful topical moisturizers. 

You also may have heard of hyaluronic acid and how vital it is to the skin. Sure, you can buy a product like a serum with this in it, but again, you can also find it in everyday foods like sweet potatoes, citrus fruits, and bone broth.






Make your skin a priority

The reality is, we often think of skin purely cosmetically and we usually don’t start paying attention to it until it shows problems or aging, but when we give it some attention, or skin can tell us a lot about other aspects of our health.

So although the American Academy of Dermatologists recognizes skin care during the month of November, use these simple keys to keep your skin healthy all year long.





Make your skin a priority

The reality is, we often think of skin purely cosmetically and we usually don’t start paying attention to it until it shows problems or aging, but when we give it some attention, or skin can tell us a lot about other aspects of our health.

So although the American Academy of Dermatologists recognizes skin care during the month of November, use these simple keys to keep your skin healthy all year long.