Vaping: A Scary New Way to Smoke

Doctors To Youhealth, highlight2, Wellness

In the world of house calls, we get summoned for a wide variety of reasons, but as new products and pastimes hit the marketplace, we’re finding that our relationships with the people we help are also becoming more multifaceted. Vaping, unfortunately, has become a new way for us to get acquainted with you.

Smoking has been a leisure activity for people since before Christ; it wasn’t until 1965 that the U.S. added a warning label to commercial cigarette products which stated: “CAUTION: CIGARETTE SMOKING MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH.”

The warning label has since undergone various iterations in appearance and in wording, but the overall message remained the same: smoking cigarettes can kill you.

So with all of the negative press surrounding the most famous tobacco product, new, fun, and legal products began surfacing, which seemed to target younger generations that didn’t necessarily see smoking as the rite of passage that, perhaps, their parents and grandparents had. 

In the mid-2000s, the smokeless, non-tobacco cigarette became popular in the U.S. (by way of China), and vaping started it’s ascendence in the smoking culture.




In the world of house calls, we get summoned for a wide variety of reasons, but as new products and pastimes hit the marketplace, we’re finding that our relationships with the people we help are also becoming more multifaceted. Vaping, unfortunately, has become a new way for us to get acquainted with you.

Smoking has been a leisure activity for people since before Christ; it wasn’t until 1965 that the U.S. added a warning label to commercial cigarette products which stated: “CAUTION: CIGARETTE SMOKING MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH.”

The warning label has since undergone various iterations in appearance and in wording, but the overall message remained the same: smoking cigarettes can kill you.

So with all of the negative press surrounding the most famous tobacco product, new, fun, and legal products began surfacing, which seemed to target younger generations that didn’t necessarily see smoking as the rite of passage that, perhaps, their parents and grandparents had. 

In the mid-2000s, the smokeless, non-tobacco cigarette became popular in the U.S. (by way of China), and vaping started it’s ascendence in the smoking culture.




What is vaping?

Vaping isn’t new and neither are e-cigarettes, but when things become popular, not to mention when lives are lost, people tend to start taking notice.

Again, the idea of an electronic cigarette is not new; the technology was patented back in 1965 (yes, the same year the traditional cigarette got its warning label). But even into the 90s, the FDA wouldn’t allow tobacco companies to sell e-cigarette products, even though the initial idea was that it’d be safer than cigarettes. So it wasn’t until 2007 that the U.S. sold its first vaporizers, and it’s taken off since then.

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling aerosol, often referred to as vapor, which is produced by an e-cigarette or similar device. The term is used because e-cigarettes do not produce tobacco smoke, but rather an aerosol, often mistaken for water vapor, that actually consists of fine particles. Many of these particles contain varying amounts of toxic chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, as well as respiratory and heart disease.The liquids used in the e-cig (“e-liquid”) contains three major components, including a VG/PG base, nicotine, and flavoring--often an exotic, fruity, or sweet tasting flavor. These can be either chemicals or substances derived through chemical processes.


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The bad news on vaping...

Vaping has been in the news a lot recently--all bad news, unfortunately. “As of October 15, 2019 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 1,479 vaping-related lung injury cases, with 33 deaths.”

Although the act of vaping isn’t inherently bad, but like anything, misuse or altered use can result in negative side effects, and even death. The CDC believe that products containing THC, which is the compound in cannabis that produces the “high” is the reason for concern and the culprit behind illness. 

“About 78 percent of patients reported using THC-containing products in the 3 months prior to the start of their symptoms. However, 10 percent reported using only nicotine-containing products.”

Like any legal drug, such as alcohol, marijuana, or tobacco, if it’s mixed or “laced” with something else intended to give the user a stronger or better result, vaping can be transformed from an innocuous, fun, relaxing thing, to something extremely dangerous.

The true danger with vaping is that, even with legal, store-bought products, you really have no idea what they’re vaporizing and how it may react in your body.

“People affected by these illnesses range in age from 13 to 75 years old. But 79 percent are under age 35. The average age of those who have died is 44.”

What is vaping?

Vaping isn’t new and neither are e-cigarettes, but when things become popular, not to mention when lives are lost, people tend to start taking notice.

Again, the idea of an electronic cigarette is not new; the technology was patented back in 1965 (yes, the same year the traditional cigarette got its warning label). But even into the 90s, the FDA wouldn’t allow tobacco companies to sell e-cigarette products, even though the initial idea was that it’d be safer than cigarettes. So it wasn’t until 2007 that the U.S. sold its first vaporizers, and it’s taken off since then.

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling aerosol, often referred to as vapor, which is produced by an e-cigarette or similar device. The term is used because e-cigarettes do not produce tobacco smoke, but rather an aerosol, often mistaken for water vapor, that actually consists of fine particles. Many of these particles contain varying amounts of toxic chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, as well as respiratory and heart disease.The liquids used in the e-cig (“e-liquid”) contains three major components, including a VG/PG base, nicotine, and flavoring--often an exotic, fruity, or sweet tasting flavor. These can be either chemicals or substances derived through chemical processes.


Image

The bad news on vaping...

Vaping has been in the news a lot recently--all bad news, unfortunately. “As of October 15, 2019 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 1,479 vaping-related lung injury cases, with 33 deaths.”

Although the act of vaping isn’t inherently bad, but like anything, misuse or altered use can result in negative side effects, and even death. The CDC believe that products containing THC, which is the compound in cannabis that produces the “high” is the reason for concern and the culprit behind illness. 

“About 78 percent of patients reported using THC-containing products in the 3 months prior to the start of their symptoms. However, 10 percent reported using only nicotine-containing products.”

Like any legal drug, such as alcohol, marijuana, or tobacco, if it’s mixed or “laced” with something else intended to give the user a stronger or better result, vaping can be transformed from an innocuous, fun, relaxing thing, to something extremely dangerous.

The true danger with vaping is that, even with legal, store-bought products, you really have no idea what they’re vaporizing and how it may react in your body.

“People affected by these illnesses range in age from 13 to 75 years old. But 79 percent are under age 35. The average age of those who have died is 44.”






What is EVALI:

Vaping related illness now has an official new name by which clinicians can refer, which is: e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI). This is a way for physicians to immediately assume a cause for illness based on symptoms and questions, and be able to quickly began a treatment.

But there are still some things the CDC doesn’t know:

As of October 2019, FDA and CDC have not identified the cause or causes of the lung injuries in these cases, and the only commonality among all cases is that patients report the use of e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

No one compound or ingredient has emerged as the cause of these illnesses to date; and it may be that there is more than one cause of this outbreak. Many different substances and product sources are still under investigation. The specific chemical exposure(s) causing lung injuries associated with e-cigarette product use, or vaping, also remains unknown.

So what should you do?

As the FDA is currently considering more graphic labels on cigarette products, they have this new issue surrounding e-cigarettes to also try and figure out.

With 1 in 5 high school students, and 1 in 20 middle school students vaping, the government has a new problem to consider regulating, but with the wide variety of products on the market, and the idea of “the unknown” in street products, it’s hard to know what or how to regulate this.

With smoking cigarettes or e-cigs, you’re basically trying to decide whether to die eventually or potentially die immediately. So, the goal should be to just not smoke at all.



What is EVALI:

Vaping related illness now has an official new name by which clinicians can refer, which is: e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI). This is a way for physicians to immediately assume a cause for illness based on symptoms and questions, and be able to quickly began a treatment.

But there are still some things the CDC doesn’t know:

As of October 2019, FDA and CDC have not identified the cause or causes of the lung injuries in these cases, and the only commonality among all cases is that patients report the use of e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

No one compound or ingredient has emerged as the cause of these illnesses to date; and it may be that there is more than one cause of this outbreak. Many different substances and product sources are still under investigation. The specific chemical exposure(s) causing lung injuries associated with e-cigarette product use, or vaping, also remains unknown.

So what should you do?

As the FDA is currently considering more graphic labels on cigarette products, they have this new issue surrounding e-cigarettes to also try and figure out.

With 1 in 5 high school students, and 1 in 20 middle school students vaping, the government has a new problem to consider regulating, but with the wide variety of products on the market, and the idea of “the unknown” in street products, it’s hard to know what or how to regulate this.

With smoking cigarettes or e-cigs, you’re basically trying to decide whether to die eventually or potentially die immediately. So, the goal should be to just not smoke at all.