What You Need to Know About Alzheimer’s

Doctors To YouDWC feature, health, Wellness

As house call doctors, we are often called to the homes of those suffering from Alzheimer’s. Incidentally, this debilitating brain disease is the 6th leading cause of death in America. But what is Alzheimer’s, who’s affected, and how can we prevent this?

America is among the top ten, but which countries have the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the world? What’s the connection? According to Alzheimer’s Disease TV, “The causes may not be as mysterious as health experts, regulators and industry want us to believe. We could be spreading neurodegenerative disease through infectious waste.”

Let’s take a look at Alzheimer’s for a better understanding of how you can deal with it, whether trying to prevent it later in your own life or handling the effects of it with a loved one who may be suffering.




As house call doctors, we are often called to the homes of those suffering from Alzheimer’s. Incidentally, this debilitating brain disease is the 6th leading cause of death in America. But what is Alzheimer’s, who’s affected, and how can we prevent this?

America is among the top ten, but which countries have the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the world? What’s the connection? According to Alzheimer’s Disease TV, “The causes may not be as mysterious as health experts, regulators and industry want us to believe. We could be spreading neurodegenerative disease through infectious waste.”

Let’s take a look at Alzheimer’s for a better understanding of how you can deal with it, whether trying to prevent it later in your own life or handling the effects of it with a loved one who may be suffering.




What You Need to Know About Alzheimer's

Many people have heard of Alzheimer's but they don’t fully understand what this disease is and how it can affect their loved ones. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s is fairly common, so understanding this disease can help you cope with a diagnosis. Here is what you need to know about Alzheimer's. 

What separates the places with lower rates from those with higher rates? And is it all just genetics? “Well, the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is significantly lower for Africans in Nigeria than for African Americans in Indianapolis, for example—up to five times lower,” according to NutritionFacts.org.

“Globally, the lowest validated rates of Alzheimer’s in the world are rural India, where they eat low meat, high grain, high bean, high carb diets. This is consistent with data showing those who eat vegetarian appear two to three times less likely to become demented, and the longer one eats meat-free, the lower the associated risk of dementia.”

So although there may not be a clear cut way of preventing it, there are steps you can take to reduce the likelihood of contracting it: low meat, high grain, high bean, high carb diets. But also, spices may also play a major role in keeping Alzheimer’s at bay. Countries with lower numbers tend to be countries that use lots of spices in their cuisines—curry, turmeric, cinnamon, and pepper.


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What is Alzheimer's Disease?

Alzheimer's is a very common form of dementia. Dementia is the term used for any condition that causes a decline in memory and cognitive abilities. Alzheimer's usually affects people over the age of 65, but it can occur in younger people.

Alzheimer's is a chronic condition that causes the death of brain cells that are responsible for memory and other cognitive functions. This disease progresses over time, and there is no known cause. Your age, genetics, and family history play a role in your risk for developing this disease. However, having a family member with Alzheimer's does not automatically mean you'll also develop it.

The Stages of Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's has a wide variety of symptoms, but since the disease is progressive, they will get worse over time. There are seven stages of Alzheimer's. Symptoms can vary depending on the person, but most cases follow this pattern.

Stage 1 – No Symptoms

In this stage, there are no outward symptoms of Alzheimer's. However, brain tests, like a PET scan, can show if the patient has developed this disease.  

Stage 2 – Minor Forgetfulness

This stage is characterized by small lapses of memory that most people will not notice. However, the patient may notice that they're having a hard time remembering a word here or there, or misplacing objects.

Stage 3 – Mild Impairment

In this stage, the patient will begin to show signs of decline, but these symptoms usually don't interfere with their quality of life. Their loved ones may notice that they are having trouble remembering things they just read or asking the same questions over and over again.

Stage 4 – Moderate Impairment

Stage 4 is when most patients are diagnosed. This stage of Alzheimer's is still considered mild, but the patient may have trouble performing tasks, such as cooking meals or signing checks. They may also start to forget the time of year or details about themselves. At this point, the patient should no longer be driving and may need more help at home.

Stage 5 – Moderate to Severe Impairment

At this stage, the patient will need more help with day to day activities. They will have trouble remembering their basic identification information and may have difficulty picking out seasonally appropriate clothing.

Stage 6 – Severe Impairment

Once a patient reaches this stage, they will need full time care in order to help them dress and go to the bathroom. They may also have delusions and confuse their caregivers and family members for other people. 

Stage 7 – Very Severe Impairment

At this stage, a patient will need care doing essential functions like eating and walking. They will need full-time care to ensure that they are moving around daily. The ability to speak and make facial expressions may also fade at this point.

What You Need to Know About Alzheimer's

Many people have heard of Alzheimer's but they don’t fully understand what this disease is and how it can affect their loved ones. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s is fairly common, so understanding this disease can help you cope with a diagnosis. Here is what you need to know about Alzheimer's. 

What separates the places with lower rates from those with higher rates? And is it all just genetics? “Well, the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is significantly lower for Africans in Nigeria than for African Americans in Indianapolis, for example—up to five times lower,” according to NutritionFacts.org.

“Globally, the lowest validated rates of Alzheimer’s in the world are rural India, where they eat low meat, high grain, high bean, high carb diets. This is consistent with data showing those who eat vegetarian appear two to three times less likely to become demented, and the longer one eats meat-free, the lower the associated risk of dementia.”

So although there may not be a clear cut way of preventing it, there are steps you can take to reduce the likelihood of contracting it: low meat, high grain, high bean, high carb diets. But also, spices may also play a major role in keeping Alzheimer’s at bay. Countries with lower numbers tend to be countries that use lots of spices in their cuisines—curry, turmeric, cinnamon, and pepper.


Image

What is Alzheimer's Disease?

Alzheimer's is a very common form of dementia. Dementia is the term used for any condition that causes a decline in memory and cognitive abilities. Alzheimer's usually affects people over the age of 65, but it can occur in younger people.

Alzheimer's is a chronic condition that causes the death of brain cells that are responsible for memory and other cognitive functions. This disease progresses over time, and there is no known cause. Your age, genetics, and family history play a role in your risk for developing this disease. However, having a family member with Alzheimer's does not automatically mean you'll also develop it.

The Stages of Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's has a wide variety of symptoms, but since the disease is progressive, they will get worse over time. There are seven stages of Alzheimer's. Symptoms can vary depending on the person, but most cases follow this pattern.

Stage 1 – No Symptoms

In this stage, there are no outward symptoms of Alzheimer's. However, brain tests, like a PET scan, can show if the patient has developed this disease.  

Stage 2 – Minor Forgetfulness

This stage is characterized by small lapses of memory that most people will not notice. However, the patient may notice that they're having a hard time remembering a word here or there, or misplacing objects.

Stage 3 – Mild Impairment

In this stage, the patient will begin to show signs of decline, but these symptoms usually don't interfere with their quality of life. Their loved ones may notice that they are having trouble remembering things they just read or asking the same questions over and over again.

Stage 4 – Moderate Impairment

Stage 4 is when most patients are diagnosed. This stage of Alzheimer's is still considered mild, but the patient may have trouble performing tasks, such as cooking meals or signing checks. They may also start to forget the time of year or details about themselves. At this point, the patient should no longer be driving and may need more help at home.

Stage 5 – Moderate to Severe Impairment

At this stage, the patient will need more help with day to day activities. They will have trouble remembering their basic identification information and may have difficulty picking out seasonally appropriate clothing.

Stage 6 – Severe Impairment

Once a patient reaches this stage, they will need full time care in order to help them dress and go to the bathroom. They may also have delusions and confuse their caregivers and family members for other people. 

Stage 7 – Very Severe Impairment

At this stage, a patient will need care doing essential functions like eating and walking. They will need full-time care to ensure that they are moving around daily. The ability to speak and make facial expressions may also fade at this point.


Ways to Prevent Alzheimer's

Unfortunately, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. However, there are ways to prevent the development of this disease. The best way is to lead a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. The best diet contains lots of plant-based foods, lean meats, and plenty of healthy fats. Quitting smoking and losing weight is also helpful.

Another way to prevent Alzheimer's is to do brain-training exercises and maintain an active social life. Remaining engaged with your social circle is key to preventing memory decline! You can also do cognitive training by reading, doing puzzles, and working on brain-teasing exercises.

Alzheimer's is a difficult disease to live with. It's also hard for caregivers and loved ones to watch their friend and family member decline. However, some treatments can help slow the progress of the diseases and reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer's. If you suspect you have Alzheimer's, visit your doctor right away. They can provide treatment so you can live a healthy, happy life.




Ways to Prevent Alzheimer's

Unfortunately, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. However, there are ways to prevent the development of this disease. The best way is to lead a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. The best diet contains lots of plant-based foods, lean meats, and plenty of healthy fats. Quitting smoking and losing weight is also helpful.

Another way to prevent Alzheimer's is to do brain-training exercises and maintain an active social life. Remaining engaged with your social circle is key to preventing memory decline! You can also do cognitive training by reading, doing puzzles, and working on brain-teasing exercises.

Alzheimer's is a difficult disease to live with. It's also hard for caregivers and loved ones to watch their friend and family member decline. However, some treatments can help slow the progress of the diseases and reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer's. If you suspect you have Alzheimer's, visit your doctor right away. They can provide treatment so you can live a healthy, happy life.