Don’t overlook your eye health

Doctors To YouDWC feature, health, WellnessLeave a Comment

Eyes are often taken for granted. We usually only bother to worry about the health of eyes when issues start to arise with our vision. Which is why during National Save Your Vision Month, we want to take the opportunity to share a few tips on things you can do that’ll help keep you seeing clearly.




Eyes are often taken for granted. We usually only bother to worry about the health of eyes when issues start to arise with our vision. Which is why during National Save Your Vision Month,we want to take the opportunity to share a few tips on things you can do that’ll help keep you seeing clearly.




Be ware of blue light

The term “blue light” has become popular in recent years due to the increased use of visual display units (VDUs), such as computers, tablets, and cell phones.

Blue light is a very specific type of glow emitted from digital screens. Studies have shown a link between the use of this technology and damage to eyesight and various other health issues: headaches, sleep disorders, blurred vision, dry eyes, and eye strain.

Since this blue light can make it difficult for you to fall asleep, optometrists recommend setting alarms or setting your phone to automatically filter blue light at night. Night shift mode will transition your screen to an orange hue, which is a lot more soothing to the eye.


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Exercise your eyes

Did you know that you could exercise your eyes? And in fact, eye exercises can actually help to improve your vision.

Blue light isn’t the most harmful thing about our overindulgence of digital devices today. Having these objects—in this case, our screens—so close to our faces for extended periods causes us to underutilize eye muscles. Part of training the eyes involves taking the time to work the muscles.

If you sit in front of a computer or your smaller digital devices often, you want to take a break at least once an hour.

However, the American Optometric Association recommends the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes on the device, take a 20-second break, and look at something 20 feet away.

Visual training involves using your eyes to focus on varying distances because this helps to change the shape of the lens, therefore “exercising” it.


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    Be ware of blue light

    The term “blue light” has become popular in recent years due to the increased use of visual display units (VDUs), such as computers, tablets, and cell phones.

    Blue light is a very specific type of glow emitted from digital screens. Studies have shown a link between the use of this technology and damage to eyesight and various other health issues: headaches, sleep disorders, blurred vision, dry eyes, and eye strain.

    Since this blue light can make it difficult for you to fall asleep, optometrists recommend setting alarms or setting your phone to automatically filter blue light at night. Night shift mode will transition your screen to an orange hue, which is a lot more soothing to the eye.


    Image

    Exercise your eyes

    Did you know that you could exercise your eyes? And in fact, eye exercises can actually help to improve your vision.

    Blue light isn’t the most harmful thing about our overindulgence of digital devices today. Having these objects—in this case, our screens—so close to our faces for extended periods causes us to underutilize eye muscles. Part of training the eyes involves taking the time to work the muscles.

    If you sit in front of a computer or your smaller digital devices often, you want to take a break at least once an hour.

    However, the American Optometric Association recommends the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes on the device, take a 20-second break, and look at something 20 feet away.

    Visual training involves using your eyes to focus on varying distances because this helps to change the shape of the lens, therefore “exercising” it.


      Image

      Foods for eye health

      When it comes to eye health, the best diet really doesn’t stray too far from the formula you’d use to benefit your overall health—whole foods, keeps it as close to nature as possible.

      "One of the best things you can do for your eyes is to eat a balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables, but also low in saturated fats and sugar," says Dr. Leland Carr, OD, and professor of optometry at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma.

      "Along with the vitamins, you should be sure to take in adequate amounts of the minerals zinc and selenium, both of which help protect the retina – the light-sensitive part of the back of the eye. You also need some fatty acids—usually from fish—to ensure adequate moisture in your eyes. Ask your family doctor if taking food supplements containing these substances is right for you."

      Of course, however, there are some specific foods that may have a more direct benefit for your eyes.

      We’ve all heard that carrots are good for eyesight, but why? Well, “the root vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, a naturally occurring pigment that nourishes the eye,” says Scientific America.

      But carrots alone aren’t going to save or improve eyesight. Foods like sweet potatoes, bell peppers, salmon, eggs, berries, green leafy veggies, and even turkey, all have nutrients that are very helpful for good eyesight.





      Dr. Carr for VSP has a suggested list of foods you need to take in (at least three servings a week) to keep those eyes healthy… Yes, three servings from each group!

      Vitamin A:

      Carrots, kale, spinach, dairy products, egg yolks

      Vitamin C:

      Citrus fruits (especially kiwi fruit) and juices, green peppers, broccoli, potatoes

      Vitamin E:

      Eggs, whole grains, vegetable oils, sunflower seeds

      Lutein:

      Spinach, corn, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts

      Fatty acids:

      Coldwater fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and rainbow trout; healthy oils

      Zinc:

      Meat, poultry, fish, whole grains, dairy products

      Also, here are a few rather unusual foods that are likewise great for eye health:

      Dragon fruit: High in vitamin C, which helps protect the cornea

      Mangosteen: High in vitamin C and help improve blood flow to the eyes

      Jackfruit: Vitamin A also protects the mucous membrane of the cornea, which acts as a barrier against bacteria

      Kiwano: High in Vitamin A



      Foods for eye health

      When it comes to eye health, the best diet really doesn’t stray too far from the formula you’d use to benefit your overall health—whole foods, keeps it as close to nature as possible.

      "One of the best things you can do for your eyes is to eat a balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables, but also low in saturated fats and sugar," says Dr. Leland Carr, OD, and professor of optometry at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma.

      "Along with the vitamins, you should be sure to take in adequate amounts of the minerals zinc and selenium, both of which help protect the retina – the light-sensitive part of the back of the eye. You also need some fatty acids—usually from fish—to ensure adequate moisture in your eyes. Ask your family doctor if taking food supplements containing these substances is right for you."

      Of course, however, there are some specific foods that may have a more direct benefit for your eyes.

      We’ve all heard that carrots are good for eyesight, but why? Well, “the root vegetable is rich in beta-carotene, a naturally occurring pigment that nourishes the eye,” says Scientific America.

      But carrots alone aren’t going to save or improve eyesight. Foods like sweet potatoes, bell peppers, salmon, eggs, berries, green leafy veggies, and even turkey, all have nutrients that are very helpful for good eyesight.





      Dr. Carr for VSP has a suggested list of foods you need to take in (at least three servings a week) to keep those eyes healthy… Yes, three servings from each group!

      Vitamin A:

      Carrots, kale, spinach, dairy products, egg yolks

      Vitamin C:

      Citrus fruits (especially kiwi fruit) and juices, green peppers, broccoli, potatoes

      Vitamin E:

      Eggs, whole grains, vegetable oils, sunflower seeds

      Lutein:

      Spinach, corn, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts

      Fatty acids:

      Coldwater fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and rainbow trout; healthy oils

      Zinc:

      Meat, poultry, fish, whole grains, dairy products

      Also, here are a few rather unusual foods that are likewise great for eye health:

      Dragon fruit: High in vitamin C, which helps protect the cornea

      Mangosteen: High in vitamin C and help improve blood flow to the eyes

      Jackfruit: Vitamin A also protects the mucous membrane of the cornea, which acts as a barrier against bacteria

      Kiwano: High in Vitamin A


      Tips for lasting eye health

      So, if you want to keep your eyes is good working order, here are some quick takeaways and tips to help with what you have to do:

      1. You want to get your eyes checked every few years, even if you don’t have any problems and believe your eyes are working well. Maybe you don’t know how much better can actually see until you get it tested.
      2. Diet is essentially to any aspect of health. Make sure you’re getting in those healthy fatty acids, along with your Vitamins A, C, E.
      3. Do your eye exercises. Staring at screens for long period can ruin your vision, so make sure to follow the 20-20-20 rule.
      4. Keep a pair of sunshades on-hand, particularly ones with added UVA and UVB protective lenses. And if you’ve already been prescribed glasses or contacts, you have to wear them.

      Image



      Tips for lasting eye health

      So, if you want to keep your eyes is good working order, here are some quick takeaways and tips to help with what you have to do:

      1. You want to get your eyes checked every few years, even if you don’t have any problems and believe your eyes are working well. Maybe you don’t know how much better can actually see until you get it tested.
      2. Diet is essentially to any aspect of health. Make sure you’re getting in those healthy fatty acids, along with your Vitamins A, C, E.
      3. Do your eye exercises. Staring at screens for long period can ruin your vision, so make sure to follow the 20-20-20 rule.
      4. Keep a pair of sunshades on-hand, particularly ones with added UVA and UVB protective lenses. And if you’ve already been prescribed glasses or contacts, you have to wear them.

      Image



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